Indonesian court finally agrees with citizens - the President and his aides have to take action to address Jakarta's air pollution

Indonesian court finally agrees with citizens - the President and his aides have to take action to...

The President of the Republic of Indonesia, the Ministers of Environment and Forestry, Home Affairs, and Health, as well as the Governor of Jakarta are sentenced to make and...

read more
NGOs: Governments need new tools to control air pollution urgently

NGOs: Governments need new tools to control air pollution urgently

After two years, the Central Jakarta court still has not announced the decision of a Citizen Lawsuit (CLS) demanding clean air for Jakarta. Thirty-two people submitted a CLS in...

read more
Transparent pollution control for Indonesia. “We want to see blue skies again”

Transparent pollution control for Indonesia. “We want to see blue skies again”

The non-governmental organisations (NGO) Nexus3 Foundation from Indonesia and Arnika from the Czech Republic have launched a new project aiming to help with controlling and...

read more

Indonesia

Indonesia is a country of 17,508 islands with over a quarter of a billion inhabitants. Add to this the mining and burning of coal, the felling and burning of rainforests, the mining of gold in small mines, and the import of waste are all threats to biodiversity, the environment and the health of the population of Indonesia and are some of the country's biggest environmental problems. In addition, it is difficult for the island state to control the import of waste and raw materials, including the problematic mercury for gold mining

indonesiaEconomic and industrial growth in Indonesia has not always been linked to appropriate regulations, so we are helping local organizations to map the level of environmental pollution and its effects on the health of the population. In 2012, we started with analyzes of mercury around small gold mines. Since 2018, we have been investigating pollution in the vicinity of places affected by the uncontrolled import of plastics from around the world on the island of Java.

In early 2021, together with the local Nexus3 Foundation, we launched a new project to create a network of NGOs to monitor pollution in the country, thereby strengthening the role of civil society in preventing toxic pollution and its impact on human health. The project also aims to support the starting up of the PRTR, Pollutant Release and Transfer Register, which is still lacking in Indonesia.

In the long term, we are also working to increase the ability of Indonesian citizens to understand and collect data on toxic pollution to use it in political dialogue and activism. These and other activities can be successfully pursued thanks to the support of the international network IPEN and the European Union.


arnika-transpNexus3-logo-aipen logo cmyk 2019-final-02